logo 30 seconds of code Curated collection of useful JavaScript snippets that you can understand in 30 seconds or less.



Adapter

ary

Creates a function that accepts up to n arguments, ignoring any additional arguments.

Call the provided function, fn, with up to n arguments, using Array.prototype.slice(0,n) and the spread operator (...).

const ary = (fn, n) => (...args) => fn(...args.slice(0, n));
const firstTwoMax = ary(Math.max, 2);
[[2, 6, 'a'], [8, 4, 6], [10]].map(x => firstTwoMax(...x)); // [6, 8, 10]

call

Given a key and a set of arguments, call them when given a context. Primarily useful in composition.

Use a closure to call a stored key with stored arguments.

const call = (key, ...args) => context => context[key](...args);
Promise.resolve([1, 2, 3])
  .then(call('map', x => 2 * x))
  .then(console.log); // [ 2, 4, 6 ]
const map = call.bind(null, 'map');
Promise.resolve([1, 2, 3])
  .then(map(x => 2 * x))
  .then(console.log); // [ 2, 4, 6 ]

collectInto

Changes a function that accepts an array into a variadic function.

Given a function, return a closure that collects all inputs into an array-accepting function.

const collectInto = fn => (...args) => fn(args);
const Pall = collectInto(Promise.all.bind(Promise));
let p1 = Promise.resolve(1);
let p2 = Promise.resolve(2);
let p3 = new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 2000, 3));
Pall(p1, p2, p3).then(console.log); // [1, 2, 3] (after about 2 seconds)

flip

Flip takes a function as an argument, then makes the first argument the last.

Return a closure that takes variadic inputs, and splices the last argument to make it the first argument before applying the rest.

const flip = fn => (first, ...rest) => fn(...rest, first);
let a = { name: 'John Smith' };
let b = {};
const mergeFrom = flip(Object.assign);
let mergePerson = mergeFrom.bind(null, a);
mergePerson(b); // == b
b = {};
Object.assign(b, a); // == b

over

Creates a function that invokes each provided function with the arguments it receives and returns the results.

Use Array.prototype.map() and Function.prototype.apply() to apply each function to the given arguments.

const over = (...fns) => (...args) => fns.map(fn => fn.apply(null, args));
const minMax = over(Math.min, Math.max);
minMax(1, 2, 3, 4, 5); // [1,5]

overArgs

Creates a function that invokes the provided function with its arguments transformed.

Use Array.prototype.map() to apply transforms to args in combination with the spread operator (...) to pass the transformed arguments to fn.

const overArgs = (fn, transforms) => (...args) => fn(...args.map((val, i) => transforms[i](val)));
const square = n => n * n;
const double = n => n * 2;
const fn = overArgs((x, y) => [x, y], [square, double]);
fn(9, 3); // [81, 6]

pipeAsyncFunctions

Performs left-to-right function composition for asynchronous functions.

Use Array.prototype.reduce() with the spread operator (...) to perform left-to-right function composition using Promise.then(). The functions can return a combination of: simple values, Promise's, or they can be defined as async ones returning through await. All functions must be unary.

const pipeAsyncFunctions = (...fns) => arg => fns.reduce((p, f) => p.then(f), Promise.resolve(arg));
const sum = pipeAsyncFunctions(
  x => x + 1,
  x => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(() => resolve(x + 2), 1000)),
  x => x + 3,
  async x => (await x) + 4
);
(async() => {
  console.log(await sum(5)); // 15 (after one second)
})();

pipeFunctions

Performs left-to-right function composition.

Use Array.prototype.reduce() with the spread operator (...) to perform left-to-right function composition. The first (leftmost) function can accept one or more arguments; the remaining functions must be unary.

const pipeFunctions = (...fns) => fns.reduce((f, g) => (...args) => g(f(...args)));
const add5 = x => x + 5;
const multiply = (x, y) => x * y;
const multiplyAndAdd5 = pipeFunctions(multiply, add5);
multiplyAndAdd5(5, 2); // 15

promisify

Converts an asynchronous function to return a promise.

Use currying to return a function returning a Promise that calls the original function. Use the ...rest operator to pass in all the parameters.

In Node 8+, you can use util.promisify

const promisify = func => (...args) =>
  new Promise((resolve, reject) =>
    func(...args, (err, result) => (err ? reject(err) : resolve(result)))
  );
const delay = promisify((d, cb) => setTimeout(cb, d));
delay(2000).then(() => console.log('Hi!')); // // Promise resolves after 2s

rearg

Creates a function that invokes the provided function with its arguments arranged according to the specified indexes.

Use Array.prototype.map() to reorder arguments based on indexes in combination with the spread operator (...) to pass the transformed arguments to fn.

const rearg = (fn, indexes) => (...args) => fn(...indexes.map(i => args[i]));
var rearged = rearg(
  function(a, b, c) {
    return [a, b, c];
  },
  [2, 0, 1]
);
rearged('b', 'c', 'a'); // ['a', 'b', 'c']

spreadOver

Takes a variadic function and returns a closure that accepts an array of arguments to map to the inputs of the function.

Use closures and the spread operator (...) to map the array of arguments to the inputs of the function.

const spreadOver = fn => argsArr => fn(...argsArr);
const arrayMax = spreadOver(Math.max);
arrayMax([1, 2, 3]); // 3

unary

Creates a function that accepts up to one argument, ignoring any additional arguments.

Call the provided function, fn, with just the first argument given.

const unary = fn => val => fn(val);
['6', '8', '10'].map(unary(parseInt)); // [6, 8, 10]